Mocking HttpRequest Body Content When Testing Azure Function HTTP Trigger Functions

When creating Azure Functions that are triggered by an HTTP request, you may want to write unit tests for the function Run method. These unit tests can be executed outside of the Azure Functions runtime, just like testing regular methods.

If your HTTP-triggered function takes as the function input an HttpRequest (as opposed to an automatically JSON-deserialized class) you may need to provide request data in your test.

As an example, consider the following code snippet that defines an HTTP-triggered function.

[FunctionName("Portfolio")]
[return: Queue("deposit-requests")]
public static async Task<DepositRequest> Run(
    [HttpTrigger(AuthorizationLevel.Function, "post", Route = "portfolio/{investorId}")]HttpRequest req,
    [Table("Portfolio", InvestorType.Individual, "{investorId}")] Investor investor,
    string investorId,
    ILogger log)
{
    log.LogInformation($"C# HTTP trigger function processed a request.");

    string requestBody = await new StreamReader(req.Body).ReadToEndAsync();

    log.LogInformation($"Request body: {requestBody}");

    var deposit = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Deposit>(requestBody);

    // etc.
}

If the  the preceding code is executed in a test, some content needs to be provided to be used when accessing req.Body. To do this using Moq a mock HttpRequest can be created that returns a specified Stream instance for req.Body.

If you want to create a request body that contains a JSON payload, you can use the following helper method in your tests:

private static Mock<HttpRequest> CreateMockRequest(object body)
{            
    var ms = new MemoryStream();
    var sw = new StreamWriter(ms);

    var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(body);

    sw.Write(json);
    sw.Flush();

    ms.Position = 0;

    var mockRequest = new Mock<HttpRequest>();
    mockRequest.Setup(x => x.Body).Returns(ms);

    return mockRequest;
}

As an example of using this method in a test:

[Fact]
public async Task ReturnCorrectDepositInformation()
{
    var deposit = new Deposit { Amount = 42 };
    var investor = new Investor { };

    Mock<HttpRequest> mockRequest = CreateMockRequest(deposit);

    DepositRequest result = await Portfolio.Run(mockRequest.Object, investor, "42", new Mock<ILogger>().Object);

    Assert.Equal(42, result.Amount);
    Assert.Same(investor, result.Investor);
}

When the preceding test is run, the function run method will get the contents of the memory stream that contains the JSON.

To learn more about using Moq to create/configure/use mock objects check out my Mocking in .NET Core Unit Tests with Moq: Getting Started Pluralsight course. or to learn more about MemoryStream and how to work with streams in C# check out my Working with Files and Streams course.

Setting Up Mock ref Return Values in Moq

I recently received a message related to my Mocking in .NET Core Unit Tests with Moq: Getting Started Pluralsight course asking how to set the values of ref parameters.

As a (somewhat contrived) example, consider the following code:

public interface IParser
{
    bool TryParse(string value, ref int output);
}

public class Thing
{
    private readonly IParser _parser;

    public Thing(IParser parser)
    {
        _parser = parser;
    }

    public string ConvertStringIntToHex(string number)
    {
        int i = 0;

        if (_parser.TryParse(number, ref i))
        {
            return i.ToString("X");
        }

        throw new ArgumentException("The value supplied cannot be parsed into an int.", nameof(number));
    }
}

The Thing class requires an IParser to be able to work. In a test, a mocked version of an IParser can be created by Moq as the following initial test demonstrates:

[Fact]
public void ReturnHex_Fail_NoSetup()
{
    var mockParser = new Mock<IParser>();

    var sut = new Thing(mockParser.Object);

    var result = sut.ConvertStringIntToHex("255"); // fails with ArgumentException

    Assert.Equal("FF", result);
}

The preceding test will fail however because the mocked TryParse has not been configured correctly, for example specifying that the method should return true.

The following modified test attempts to fix this:

[Fact]
public void ReturnHex_Fail_NoRefValueSetup()
{
    var mockParser = new Mock<IParser>();
    mockParser.Setup(x => x.TryParse(It.IsAny<string>(), ref It.Ref<int>.IsAny))
              .Returns(true);

    var sut = new Thing(mockParser.Object);

    var result = sut.ConvertStringIntToHex("255");

    Assert.Equal("FF", result); // Fails, actual result == 0
}

In the preceding code, the return value is being set, but nowhere is the ref int output “return value” being configured.

In the following test the Callback method is used to set the ref value. To be able to do this, a delegate must first be defined that matches the signature of the mocked method that contains the ref parameter. Once this delegate is defined it can be used in the Callback method as the following code demonstrates:

// Define a delegate that can be used to set the ref value in the mocked TryParse method 
delegate void MockTryParseCallback(string number, ref int output);

[Fact]
public void ReturnHex()
{
    var mockParser = new Mock<IParser>();
    mockParser.Setup(x => x.TryParse("255", ref It.Ref<int>.IsAny)) // When the TryParse method is called with 255
              .Callback(new MockTryParseCallback((string s, ref int output) => output = 255)) // Execute callback delegate and set the ref value
              .Returns(true); // Return true as the result of the TryParse method

    var sut = new Thing(mockParser.Object);

    var result = sut.ConvertStringIntToHex("255");

    Assert.Equal("FF", result);
}

If you’ve never used Moq or want to learn more about it check out the official Moq quickstart  or head over to my Pluralsight course.

Mocking with FeatureToggle

I was asked a question on Twitter so I thought I’d write it up here.

When using the FeatureToggle library you may have some some code that behaves differently if a toggle is enabled.

When writing a test, you can create a mock IFeatureToggle and set it up to be enabled (or not) and then assert the result is as expected.

The following code show a simple console app that has an OptionsConsoleWriter.Generate method that uses a toggle to output a printing feature option:

using static System.Console;
using System.Text;
using FeatureToggle.Toggles;
using FeatureToggle.Core;

namespace ConsoleApp1
{
    public class Printing : SimpleFeatureToggle {}

    public class OptionsConsoleWriter
    {
        public string Generate(IFeatureToggle printingToggle)
        {
            var sb = new StringBuilder();

            sb.AppendLine("Options:");
            sb.AppendLine("(e)xport");
            sb.AppendLine("(s)ave");

            if (printingToggle.FeatureEnabled)
            {
                sb.AppendLine("(p)rinting");
            }

            return sb.ToString();
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Printing printingToggle = new Printing();

            string options = new OptionsConsoleWriter().Generate(printingToggle);

            Write(options);            

            ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

To write a couple of simple tests for this method, you can use a mocking framework such as Moq to generate a mocked IFeatureToggle and pass it to the Generate method:

using Xunit;
using Moq;
using FeatureToggle.Core;
using ConsoleApp1;

namespace ClassLibrary1.Tests
{
    public class OptionsConsoleWriterTests
    {
        [Fact]
        public void ShouldGeneratePrintingOption()
        {
            var sut = new OptionsConsoleWriter();

            var mockPrintingToggle = new Mock<IFeatureToggle>();
            mockPrintingToggle.SetupGet(x => x.FeatureEnabled)
                              .Returns(true);

            string options = sut.Generate(mockPrintingToggle.Object);

            Assert.Contains("(p)rinting", options);
        }

        [Fact]
        public void ShouldNotGeneratePrintingOption()
        {
            var sut = new OptionsConsoleWriter();

            var mockPrintingToggle = new Mock<IFeatureToggle>();
            mockPrintingToggle.SetupGet(x => x.FeatureEnabled)
                              .Returns(false);

            string options = sut.Generate(mockPrintingToggle.Object);

            Assert.DoesNotContain("(p)rinting", options);
        }
    }
}

Testing ASP.NET Core Controllers in Isolation with Mock Objects and Moq

In previous posts we saw how to get started testing ASP.NET Core MVC controllers and also how to use the Moq mocking library in .NET Core tests.

If there is code in controllers that needs testing, but the controller has a dependency, for example passed into the constructor, it may not make sense to use the real version of the dependency. In these cases Moq can be used to create a mock version of the dependency and pass it to the controller that needs testing.

As an example suppose we have the following controller code:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly ISmsGateway _smsGateway;

    public HomeController(ISmsGateway smsGateway)
    {
        _smsGateway = smsGateway;
    }

    [HttpPost]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public IActionResult Send(SendSmsRequest request)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            var sendReceipt = _smsGateway.Send(request.PhoneNumber, request.Message);

            return Ok(sendReceipt);
        }

        return BadRequest();
    }
}

In the preceding code, the controller takes an ISmsGateway dependency as a constructor parameter. This dependency is later used in the the Send() method.

After installing Moq a mock SMS gateway can be created. Once created, Moq’s Setup() method can be used to determine what happens when the controller calls the mocked Send() method as the following code demonstrates:

[Fact]
public void ShouldSendOk()
{
    SendSmsRequest sendSmsRequest = new SendSmsRequest
    {
        PhoneNumber = "42",
        Message = "Hello"
    };

    Guid expectedSendReceipt = Guid.NewGuid();

    var mockSmsGateway = new Mock<ISmsGateway>();
    
    mockSmsGateway.Setup(x => x.Send(sendSmsRequest.PhoneNumber, sendSmsRequest.Message))
                  .Returns(expectedSendReceipt);

    var sut = new HomeController(mockSmsGateway.Object);
    
    IActionResult result = sut.Send(sendSmsRequest);

    var okObjectResult = Assert.IsType<OkObjectResult>(result);

    Assert.Equal(expectedSendReceipt, okObjectResult.Value);
}

We may also want to test that if there is a model binding error, then  no message is sent via the SMS gateway. The follow test code shows the use of the AddModelError() method to simulate an error, and the use of Moq’s Verify() method to check that the gateway’s Send() method was never called:

[Fact]
public void ShouldNotSendWhenModelError()
{
    SendSmsRequest sendSmsRequest = new SendSmsRequest
    {
        PhoneNumber = "42",
        Message = "Hello"
    };

    var mockSmsGateway = new Mock<ISmsGateway>();

    var sut = new HomeController(mockSmsGateway.Object);
    sut.ModelState.AddModelError("Simulated", "Model error");

    sut.Send(sendSmsRequest);

    mockSmsGateway.Verify(x => x.Send(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<string>()), Times.Never);
}

To learn more about using Moq to create/configure/use mock objects check out my Mocking in .NET Core Unit Tests with Moq: Getting Started Pluralsight course, and to learn how to get started testing ASP.NET Core MVC applications check out my ASP.NET Core MVC Testing Fundamentals Pluralsight course.

Mocking in .NET Core Tests with Moq

When writing automated tests it is sometimes useful to isolate the thing(s) being tested from other parts of the system. These ‘other’ parts may still need to be provided, and sometimes the real versions are too hard or cumbersome to use. In these instances “mocked” versions can be created and used.

A mock version of something is an object that can act like the real thing but can be controlled in test code.

Moq (pronounced “mok u” or “mock”) is a library available on NuGet that allows mock objects to be created in test code and it also supports .NET Core.

Moq allows the manipulation of mock objects in many ways, including setting mock methods to return specific values, setting up properties, and matching specific arguments when the thing being tested calls the mock object.

For example, the following code shows a class that requires a constructor dependency to be able to operate:

using System;

namespace Domain
{
    public interface IThingDependency
    {
        string JoinUpper(string a, string b);
        int Meaning { get; }
    }

    // "Real" implementation
    public class ThingDependency : IThingDependency
    {
        public string JoinUpper(string a, string b)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public int Meaning => throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    // Class we want to test in isolation of ThingDependency
    public class ThingBeingTested
    {
        private readonly IThingDependency _thingDependency;

        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        public ThingBeingTested(IThingDependency thingDependency)
        {
            _thingDependency = thingDependency;
        }

        public string X()
        {
            var fullName = _thingDependency.JoinUpper(FirstName, LastName);

            return $"{fullName} = {_thingDependency.Meaning}";
        }
    }
}

Without a mock object, to write a test we could use the real ThingDependency:

[Fact]
public void TestUsingRealDependency()
{
    var sut = new ThingBeingTested(new ThingDependency());

    // test code
}

To isolate the ThingBeingTested from the rest of the system, Moq can create a mock version of an IThingDependency:

[Fact]
public void TestUsingMockDependency()
{
    // create mock version
    var mockDependency = new Mock<IThingDependency>();

    // set up mock version's method
    mockDependency.Setup(x => x.JoinUpper(It.IsAny<string>(), It.IsAny<string>()))
                  .Returns("A B");

    // set up mock version's property
    mockDependency.Setup(x => x.Meaning)
                  .Returns(42);

    // create thing being tested with a mock dependency
    var sut = new ThingBeingTested(mockDependency.Object);

    var result = sut.X();

    Assert.Equal("A B = 42", result);
}

In the preceding code, the Setup() method is used to tell the mock how to behave when it is called by the ThingBeingTested.

Moq can also be used to test the correct interactions are occurring between the ThingBeingTested and the IThingDependency:

[Fact]
public void TestUsingMockDependencyUsingInteractionVerification()
{
    // create mock version
    var mockDependency = new Mock<IThingDependency>();

    // create thing being tested with a mock dependency
    var sut = new ThingBeingTested(mockDependency.Object)
    {
        FirstName = "Sarah",
        LastName = "Smith"
    };

    sut.X();

    // Assert that the JoinUpper method was called with Sarah Smith
    mockDependency.Verify(x => x.JoinUpper("Sarah", "Smith"), Times.Once);

    // Assert that the Meaning property was accessed once
    mockDependency.Verify(x => x.Meaning, Times.Once);
}

In the preceding code, the Verify method is used to check that the mock JoinUpper method is being called exactly once with the values “Sarah” and “Smith”. The test code is also expecting the method to be called exactly once.

Moq can be used to test in isolation other parts of applications such as ASP.NET Core MVC controllers, where the controller requires a dependency (such as an IFooRepository):

[Fact]
public void ContollerTest()
{            
    var mockDependency = new Mock<IFooRepository>();

    var sut = new HomeController(mockDependency.Object);
    
    // test code
}

To learn more about using Moq to create/configure/use mock objects check out my Mocking in .NET Core Unit Tests with Moq: Getting Started Pluralsight course.

To learn how to get started testing ASP.NET Core MVC applications check out my ASP.NET Core MVC Testing Fundamentals Pluralsight course.

Automated Testing: End to End Course

My newest Pluralsight course has just been published.

We shouldn't live in fear of our code

Long-term customer satisfaction, agility, and developer happiness are crucial. A quality suite of automated tests helps achieve this. This practical course covers how and what to test at the unit, integration, and functional UI levels; and how to bring them all together with TeamCity continuous integration build server.

The course helps to keep your software soft with the right automated tests at the right level.

If you’ve never used Pluralsight before you can sign up for the free trial and get started.

Mocking Framework for Windows Store apps (and Windows Phone)

With Windows Store apps there are challenges getting traditional mocking frameworks such as Rhino and Moq working due to limited reflection support in the platform (presumably for security reasons).

I wrote a mocking solution when Windows Phone 7 first came out, it can also be used for Windows Store apps. I’ve updated the NuGet descriptions etc. to reflect this.

How To Do TDD with Mocking in Windows Store Apps

Create a new (C#/XAML) Windows Store app project in Visual Studio called “MyAwesomeApp”.

Create your test project “MyAwesomeApp.Tests” and reference your main app.

initsolutionshot

In the main app project, install the MoqaLate NuGet package.  When the package is installed you will have a new folder in the main app solution called “MoqaLateCommandLine”:

moqalteinstalled

(Inside this folder is a readmexxx.txt file with some additional info)

More...

Introducing (probably) The World's Only Mocking Framework for Windows Phone 7 (WP7)

Introducing MoqaLate

Whilst I love developing apps for Windows Phone 7, the testing aspect is hard! I'm a TDD-er by default and it's such a pain to have to hand roll my own mock objects. 

So I created MoqaLate.

It's an alpha version but is usable now.

Not sure framework is the right term but it's something that generates mocks from your interfaces.

Add to existing project from NuGet:

PM> Install-Package MoqaLate

Read more about the project.

Download an example solution.

Read (currently very basic!) documentation.

View on NuGet.org

Awesome overview diagram :)

 

Testing Events Using Rhino Mocks

There are possible more 'elegant' methods for the below but these are fairly well understandable by someone new to Rhino Mocks or mocking in general.

Testing Event Subscription

Sometimes we want to ensure that a given event has been subscribed to. The following example is essentially testing that when a new ViewModel is instantiated (the constructor accepts an IWorkPackageCoordinator as a dependency), that the events declared on the IWorkPackageCoordinator instance have been subscribed to (by the ViewModel instance). In other words: does the ViewModel subscribe to the IWorkPackageCoordinatorevents.

To test this we create a ViewModel and pass it a mock object that has been created for us by Rhino Mocks.

 

            MockRepository mocks = new MockRepository();
            IWorkPackageCoordinator mockWPC = (IWorkPackageCoordinator)mocks.StrictMock(typeof(IWorkPackageCoordinator));

            // Tell Rhino Mocks that we expect the following events to be subscriped to
            //  - we don't care about the actual delegate that is attached hence the
            // LastCall.IgnoreArguments();
            mockWPC.Downloading += null;
            LastCall.IgnoreArguments();

            mockWPC.Loading += null;   
            LastCall.IgnoreArguments();

            mockWPC.Processing += null;
            LastCall.IgnoreArguments();

            mockWPC.Saving += null;
            LastCall.IgnoreArguments();

            mocks.ReplayAll();

            new ViewModel(mockWPC);
           
            mocks.VerifyAll();  

 

Testing Event Raising\Handling

Another test that is useful is that the object we are testing performs some action when another object raises an event that it is subscribed to.

In the example below we want to test that when an IWorkPackageCoordinator raises it's Downloading event that the ViewModel in turn raises it's PropertyChanged event. We use a boolean eventRaised, and (using lambda syntax) create an anonymous event handler for the PropertyChanged event which sets eventRaised to true if the event is fired. We then tell out Rhino Mock object to raise the Downloading event (in this example with non specific event arguments 'EventArgs.Empty')

            var mockWPC = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IWorkPackageCoordinator>();
            var SUT = new ViewModel(mockWPC);

            bool eventRaised = false;

            SUT.PropertyChanged += (s, e) => { eventRaised = true; };

            // tell mock to raise event
            mockWPC.Raise(x => x.Downloading += null, this, EventArgs.Empty);

            Assert.IsTrue(eventRaised);